Po Toi Island – Getting Away From HK

Po Toi Island – Getting Away From HK

May 4, 2017 | Sights and Travels

A view of the southern part of Po Toi Island

There is only one boat in and one boat out, and it comes on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Small boats go there a lot as it is nice to swim to the island but there are no beaches, and it is the furthest point in Hong Kong. Po Toi is an inconvenient place to go to, and maybe that is why it is the perfect place to go.

The ferry leaves at 10 a.m on Tuesdays and Thursdays from the Aberdeen Ferry place. It’s not a pier but more like a floating platform. The boat is filled with bird watchers in camouflage gear. They look like they are going to war against birds but shooting with expensive cameras rather than rifles. The others look like hardcore hikers all covered head to toe in light fitting gear. The boat is only 45 minutes, and it is somewhat air conditioned. It costs $50 including the trip back but don’t lose the ticket. Po Toi Islands are a collection of islands lying 3 km away from Hong Kong Island.

The main island, with the village and boat pier, is about 4 km in size. In the past, it was home to over 1,000 people who relied on the fish to make a living. Over the years as overfishing and as the people got older more and more moved to the mainland. The primary school on the island closed down in 1981. Since then there are fewer and fewer people living on the island and has become a popular destination for hikers and birdwatchers.

After getting off the ferry there are two choices; the long trek around or just a small one to the southern area. The ferry out is at 2 pm. The shorter one is good for someone who is not as fit and is worried about time. The path is along some bushes, and then it leads to the open area of rocks, grass, and sea Po Toi Islands are a collection of islands lying 3 km away from Hong Kong Island. The main island, with the village and boat pier, is about 4 km in size. In the past, it was home to over 1,000 people who relied on the fish to make a living. Over the years as overfishing and as the people got older more and more moved to the mainland. The primary school on the island closed down in 1981. Since then there are fewer and fewer people living on the island and has become a popular destination for hikers and birdwatchers. After getting off the ferry there are two choices; the long trek around or just a small one to the southern area. The ferry out is at 2 pm. The shorter one is good for someone who is not as fit and is worried about time. The path is along some bushes, and then it leads to the open area of rocks, grass, and sea

 

View of the ‘lighthouse’

The trail is well maintained by the Lands Department. They built some bridges to make the hiking easier. The ‘lighthouse’ on the top is the highlight of the southern tour. Along the way are some tents from May Day holiday from the day before. One can rent some camping gear from one of the shops in the small village for the night though they don’t speak English. Hiking in the exposed area gives some great views, but it is hot. The path is not strenuous, but the heat can be. At the top of the hill is a small square white box with a light on the top.

The palm rocks.

A lot of the rock formations have names for what they represent or show. There is the palm which is to look like the hands of the Buddha held together as they do in the many statues. It is about 100 feet tall with four straight cracks that are formed after years and years of erosion from the waves in the sea. Walking back into the village easy but there is not much with only three restaurants which cater to the hikers and bird watchers. There are additional ferries during the Tin Hau Festival from a week ago, but that was a special occasion. The route is easy to follow as it is well paved and maintained. The furthest point is the Tin Hau Temple

View of the Tin Hau Temple with the village in the background.

It is on the northern shore of Tai Wan and has a 170-year history. Tin Hau is the local god of the sea which most pay respect for a good fish harvest. People still come to the temple even though many people from the island have moved more into Hong Kong. Walking around the island is nice mostly because it feels alone. It is getting harder and harder to find quiet places in Hong Kong. Most of the hiking trails are busy on the weekends and holidays not sure how busy this place gets then.